Marketing Buzzword - Authority Marketing - Kerri L Watt

The Marketing Buzzword Podcast on iTunesThe Marketing Buzzword Podcast on Stitcher

 

 

 

Hello again and welcome back to the Marketing Buzzword Podcast!

This is the podcast which helps you to understand what all of these business and marketing buzzwords actually mean, and how they can helpful going forward, and today’s buzzword is “Authority Marketing”

I’m your host Ben M Roberts and in this show I am the marketing bee in charge making sure I can get the right guests and ask the right questions to make these words and phrases make sense.

In addition, The Marketing Buzzword Podcast is now powered by Talkative. Talkative is a company that brings live chat, voice calls, video calls and co-browsing together, in one package. This allows you and your business to truly engage with your customers, offer quick and effective resolutions to questions and improve the customer experience. You can find out more at Talkative.uk

The Marketing Buzzword Podcast is Powered by Talkative.uk

So, how does this show work?

Simply, you, the marketing bees let me know what buzzwords you’ve been hearing, and bring them into the marketing beehive. I then bring on an expert buzzword bee from the field, who helps us identify what these buzzwords actually mean, and whether they are useful or not. Essentially, I want to de-bunk or de-mystify these words and phrases to make the marketing jargon a little easier to understand.

I’m always keen to hear about the buzzwords you are loving or hating right now so please drop me a tweet to @roberts_ben_m or simply use #marketingbuzzword on Twitter & Instagram or if you’d rather you can go on the marketingbuzzword.com website and let me know through there, and take a look at the show notes from previous guests.

Then one final thing before we get onto this weeks guest . . . if you are loving the show, please feel free to leave me a review on iTunes! It really does help boost the shows profile and make it easier to keep getting on these expert guests.

Right that’s more than enough about me. It’s time to introduce this weeks guest! This episode’s expert buzzword bee is the incredibly talented Kerri L Watt.

Kerri L Watt is the Founder and MD of the publicity and marketing agency Rising Tide Media. Kerri started the agency after a successful career in small business and hospitality marketing and brand PR consultancy. Regularly featuring in the media, award-winning Kerri is a driver for change. She is designing a creative agency powered by people who, for various reasons, need flexible hours and remote working opportunities thus bringing the world’s finest talent to clients. Her results speak for themselves and a Rising Tide does lift all boats after all.

Enough small talk . . . let’s talk “Authority Marketing”

Authority Marketing Interview between Kerri L Watt and Ben M Roberts

Ben:
Hi Kerri and welcome to the podcast.

Kerri:
Hi, thanks for having me.

Ben:
That’s alright. I’m really excited to get you on to talk about a really specific buzzword today. So what are you gonna be talking to me about?

Kerri:
Today, I’m going to be diving into Authority marketing.

Ben:
Alright, so Kerri what on earth is an authority marketing? I’ve heard the term, I’ve seen it banded about. And I’ve seen people using it in all different contexts get straight to the point, what is it?

Kerri:
The way I see it is exactly like you say. There’s lots of different definitions but the way I kind of see it and use with my clients is just anything and everything, we can do to position ourselves or our clients as an authority. And a voice to be heard like a credible expert in their field so that could be a coach, a consultant, and author. Someone who wants speaking gigs media the coverage, all those kinds of things to make them that credible go-to expert. But also, it works for all kinds of businesses, you know hotels. They can still be you know the go-to place in their industry or you know any kind of brick-and-mortar business. So it really can encompass like most and while in my opinion every business.

Ben:
So, is it being it purely related then, to individuals or is Authority marketing lending itself to businesses as well. To businesses set themselves as an authority or is it Authority marketing mostly related to individuals within businesses?

Kerri:
Great question, it usually is the people and the leaders. But you can definitely do it with the business as a whole as well. That could be through getting that business leader, more attention because you’re then bringing eyes and attention to the business or work. For example, I’ve had hotels and hospitality businesses as clients before and positioned various members of their team as experts. That could be that a head chef, their general manager and that is all helping the business as a whole as well.

Ben:
Yeah, how does it actually help businesses then? Because if you have individuals and they’re putting themselves out there. They’re writing books, they’re doing podcasts, they’re speaking with loads of speaking gigs. How does that tangibly translate to a business benefit? So, how you need to write all these books and stuff yeah, their names have been lights but how does that actually affect the business? Because ultimately the business needs to benefits. Usually, it’s the business that’s either, giving up some sort of time to let the people do it or has given some sort of backing to the individuals. So where does that lie in there?

Kerri:
Well, it definitely benefits the business in that, in my opinion, you can get really fast results. You could, authority marketing could include some media coverage or speaking opportunities. And from those, you are getting this strategically placed media coverage. That could get you in front of tens of thousands of potentials clients, who therefore ring you or come to your website or buy from you or they’re starting to resonate with your message. So, you are getting in front of the ideal people rather than paying to advertise. Which isn’t always massively targeted from some experience, that I’ve had certainly and it not always effective return on investment.

Ben:
So, in terms of, how is this different to influence marketing? Obviously, influencers there’s almost more averaging to different people. But would you almost need to replace influence marketing with authority marketing. Or would you say they almost go hand-in-hand between the two. What are sort of similarities and the differences?

Kerri:
I mean, I think they do you kind of go hand-in-hand. A lot of what Authority marketing is, it’s the activities and strategies that most marketers will probably be doing. They just don’t necessarily realise that, that it goes under that umbrella. And there are similarities with the influencer and authority but I really like that this authority marketing. Because it certainly for me when I’m doing it for clients. It gives me that as an objective rather than just I need to get this client more customers. Or I need to make them more money, having that right. I’m gonna position them as the go-to person. So when a news story breaks, the BBC is ringing them for a comment or you know anything like that. And it just it gives me that really clear focus for the goal for that client really if that makes sense.

Ben:
Yeah, makes it makes an awful lot of sense. So essentially, if I get this right. Then authority marketing is essentially setting yourself up as a thought leader, with inverted commas. Whether that’s another buzzword or not you want to talk about. But it’s like one thing, it’s set up as a thought leader, which then almost you become that influence. So then almost by doing authority marketing then set yourself up as that thought leader. To be then be used then as for influencer marketing by other people. It’s almost like a yes turn away, the weight think of the way describes it but it’s almost like a self-fulfilling prophecy almost.

Kerri:
Yeah, definitely and with authority marketing, when you are starting to become known for what you do. Especially if it’s quite a niche topic, you will just automatically be that person. That people think of and we already in our daily lives. We will have that already, we think. We need to go to the supermarket, you already have the brands in your head that you are on your go to. I want some clothes, you’ve got your go to places and it’s the same with you might say hear the word entrepreneur. You think Richard Branson, Lord Sugar, all those kinds of things. And you do that yourself so if you’re a relationship expert. You know you can very quickly be, and I’m writing a story about this. Or I really need someone to talk about this and then you are oh yeah, we’ve got to talk to that person. You will very quickly with just a few kinds of simple strategies become that go-to person.

Ben:
So, when you’re building yourself up then and you’re doing all you’re doing all this outreach. And you’re sort of putting yourself out there as an expert in a field now. How do you know when you’ve almost become that influence? How do you measure or understand that you are actually influencing? Because this to many people will say, oh I’m an influencer in my sphere. Well yeah, I’ve influenced people before, I’ve made only one person makes a decision. Because I’ve given them a really valid point and they’ve gone okay. I’ll go agree with you, how do you measure that authority? Or how do you measure that sort of in how much influence? Sure because it’s when people say oh yeah, I’m an influencer I’m an authority an expert. But what does that actually mean how the hell did you measure that how do you prove that?

Kerri:
I mean, to be honest when it makes me kind of feel a little bit icky. And I don’t like it when people actually say themselves I am an expert.

Ben:
Icky is such a great word, just says so many things on so many levels.

Kerri:
Because just saying to people, hey I’m awesome you know. And yes you might be awesome, you might be the best in your field, you kind of need to let your audience make that decision for themselves. So, with becoming that expert usually, it’s other people that give you that title. So it’s people who write about you, who talk about you, who promote you to their audience. Whatever they will give you that expert title, you don’t necessarily need to say I’m the best, I’m an expert. And with regards to seeing, how you know that it’s all working I guess. Is when you know those inquiries start coming in but the more high-quality ones. Because you’re being a little bit more strategic in your marketing. You’re getting in front of the right people and so there’s inquiries are coming in, maybe the media. The speaking opportunities are coming in, there’s a book deal you know and you’re just starting to see those results I guess. But it depends on what your objective is because some people just want more sales. Some people want more speaking gigs and it can be as simple as that so, I guess once you’re starting to see results of what you wanted to do. Then you’ve you know you on the right path.

Ben:
Yeah, that’s I think that’s a really important point to make. And a lot of it is how successful you are, almost ends upon what you’re measuring yourself against. Because success is almost in the eye of the beholder. Isn’t it, it’s like I’m successful. If I’ve achieved everything, I wanted to in life. If I say if my goal in life was to get married and have kids and I had that. Then I’m successful. Or someone else would be I want to make £2000000 in my life or someone else could be I want to visit every country in the world now. That’s success for that person but for someone else. I’d be like the hell was the point of that, you’ve just wasted your life it’s like where do you draw a line.

Ben:
It’s so individual you know, I spend years sort of you know traveling for work and being away from home. And last year moved back to where I’m originally from so tactically in my eyes, I’ve made it. And I’ve had clients who have hired me literally just to get them a handful of media coverage opportunities. And other people would be like, oh why did you do that when you could have done this. But that’s what they wanted and that’s yeah, it’s such an individual thing. And that’s what I really enjoy about the relationship, I have with clients because I’m able to kind of really dive into what it is that. They actually want and just deliver that for them you know, it doesn’t you don’t necessarily need to be on the front page of newspapers and everything to be successful and to become that authority.

Ben:
Yeah, that’s a really important point to make. And now I want to go back to almost one of the things, you said a little bit earlier. Then so you said almost like you’ll become it feels icky when people just say that they’re in it. But what if someone has when do you have the right to the core. Do you ever have the right choice of it because if someone is referred to you as an expert before. Or one whether it be 1,2,3 1000 people whatever it is someone has called you an expert. Before can you then refer to yourself as an expert. Or are you saying that you should probably actually almost never referred yourself as an expert. Even if people are calling it, you do you know what I mean I’m trying to get out from that point.

Kerri:
Yes, I do I mean it’s personal preference I mean. I actually like the definition of an expert is that you know a lot more than somebody that would buy from you I guess. You know so it’s okay to call yourself an expert, if you want to I personally don’t. And I don’t necessarily encourage my clients to but if people are starting to say that about you. There’s no harm in saying it but what I tend to do instead of putting it as your you know title or your headline on LinkedIn. You know I’m an expert you can you know do really gorgeous little images for your social media. You know of like a little testimonial of someone calling you an expert. Or use it in a different way to promote the fact that people think you’re an expert rather than just saying hey I’m an expert.

Ben:
Yeah, I think that makes an awful lot of sense. So, it’s almost about actually almost backing up what you said having some sort of an evidence back at what you said. Even whether it’s from a customer review or testimonial or whether actually just from the words and the words and language that you use almost makes a difference.

Kerri:
Yeah and I guess it depends how you think your audience will react to it you know. If they really get to know you and they know that you’re quite outspoken or confident or like you know it might work for you. As long as long as it resonates with your audience then I guess it doesn’t really matter you know what anyone else thinks really.

Ben:
Yeah, you bought your own person. Yes go everyone else, I don’t care about you this is my thing. A serious point then is how do you okay so you think okay great this authority marketing is for me. I want to be known as an expert inverted comma. I always do these inverted commas on an audio podcast. I think if someone’s looking at me, it was really weird anyway so you decide the authority marketing is what you want to do? And you said you want to be seen as an expert in your field, how do people stand out these days? Because as far as I see Mark Masters, come on the podcast a few weeks and we talked about great content and how everyone’s sounding exactly the same. And how people need to do something a bit different so how do people actually stand out then as an authority in the field.

Kerri:
Such a good question, I would say first you need to get really clear on what it is you actually want to be known for. For instance, with marketing you know that’s a huge topic, you need to niche down and like actually think about what your thing is. Or it could be absolutely anything, if you own a retail store, just absolutely anything really niches down. And think about what it is that you want to be known for and then when you know that and that that’s relevant to your audience. That’s when you can then start doing some, perhaps some media coverage. So maybe write some articles how-to articles that are around. What you want to be known for and you know your audience will be interested in reading. You could do things like podcasts, you know go on a podcast and the interviewed knowing. That it’s going to get in front of your ideal client, you can contact your local newspaper and give them a few ideas on some stories or maybe something’s happening in your local area that you are affected by in some way. But whether that’s personal or work-related and you can give them a little comment or your opinion or something. So there’s lots of different things like that and then certainly content, is really that’s where you can up your game. It’s all very well saying I’ll write a blog post but kind of again makes me feel a bit icky. When people just say just write a blog post, it’s like blog posts are important. But it’s doing them in the right way and certainly if you want to become an authority. I would definitely say have a look at other people who are an authority and maybe a few steps ahead of you and get them involved. So a really good tip when it comes to content, that I kind of do with my clients and share with my audience, is when you are writing a blog post don’t just write five tips to blah blah blah. Put some little tweetables in there so and put something in there where people can share it and also get in touch with influencers and other experts get them to comment on the topic that you’re writing about. Then hopefully they will then share that blog post out with their audience as well. I’ve done that by actually contacting people and saying, “hey I’m writing about this can I have a quote”. Or you can just take a quote from their book or something they’ve already written, so you don’t have to necessarily contact them. But you can still get all these big names involved in your content and that is going to set you apart from anybody else. That’s just writing normal stuff or just doing the odd Facebook live and once you start doing that consistently. Putting out a blog post or a LinkedIn posts articles Facebook whatever it is that you’re using. Once you start doing that consistently it is unbelievable how quickly your engagement and your views and comments and everything will grow very quickly.

Ben:
I think that’s important. So one thing I wanted to asked next, which you sort of really alluded to an answer, was almost how you do it? And I think a lot of it is just being human, just having a conversation, to stop being afraid to ask people. And just being able to sort of say, look you might give me a quote because at the end of the day it, not just helps you it also helps them as well. They get a little bit exposure as well. It’s like almost like people and people want to help each other people. What if people you see that them as an expert, they appreciate the fact you’ve asked them because you see them in the light. That they want to portray themselves as. So why they wouldn’t help you if they can.

Kerri:
Absolutely yeah. As long as you ask them in the right way you treat them with respect. And actually I’ve had a lot of people who asked me to do something for them and I think yeah okay I’ll try that. Then it just maybe hasn’t quite worked out or they’ve canceled the call that we arranged or you know they haven’t then promoted the post that they were going to and I kind of again makes you a little you know bit icky. Yeah so, it’s like if you ask someone to do something really deliver on what you’ve actually said to do as well. And really make them so good like so happy, that they said yes to you as well. It’s like doing a favor for anyone, isn’t it. You do that for friends you know, don’t let them down really well.

Ben:
Yes, I guess it’s almost that old saying of, ‘do unto others as you’d have them do unto you”. If you’re gonna promise something and you want to deliver this and you won’t have success in yourself you almost got to help other people as well. Because what’s I think don’t squish everyone on the way up because your gonna need them on the way back down. Or so there’s something, it’s some term like that. Anyway, people are always willing to help you as long as it’s not all given and also not all take. But you’re also doing a lot of giving back and you’re getting that balance right. It’s also difficult though because you don’t over-give as well sometimes because I’ve done it before with some consultancy stuff. Where yes I’ll give you an hour of my time and I’m like what we met each other for about three hours now. And I’ve done this way when I could have been earning some money as well. It’s like please give me something.

Kerri:
Yeah, you just got to make sure your kind of using your time effectively really. That’s just it’s so important.

Ben:
Yeah, one thing I also thought of them is I’d love to hear your opinion on this. So what is your opinion on actually paying to be involved in events and paying your way to become an influencer? In terms of, actually sort of thing someone says oh we don’t you need to pay either sort of exhibit a stand. I mean what’s your opinion on that sort of thing that paying to become an influencer or authority?

Kerri:
Yeah, I mean I don’t always recommend investing and stuff. I’ll be honest because I really love being able to get free and really low-cost opportunities out to people. For instance, media coverage and speaking events so what I usually say is, if you want to exhibit an event you know if sometimes you can offer to speak or host a workshop and you get a free stand you know you get involved with them in some other way. So you don’t have to spend a thousand pounds a day to be exhibiting I mean certainly, some exhibitions are really worthwhile if you know that hundreds of your ideal client are actually going to come through the door. And you’re actually, going to make the most of it so if you’re going to invest in an exhibition stand then you better make sure. You’ve got your A-game, you’ve had a really good breakfast, you’ve got high energy and that your whole team is on board. You’re not just sat behind the desk on a chair with your arms folded, it’s one of my pet peeves.

Ben:
Yeah, it sat up, behind the table arms crossed.

Kerri:
They just don’t care. I’m just like you’ve paid to be here, talk to me I shouldn’t have to come over to your stand and read your roller banner. Pike tell me what, grab my attention tell me. What do you do?

Ben:
Yeah, the other one where you see the roller banner has always been put in front of the stands. So you couldn’t even get into the damn place in the first place. This is a big roller banner in the place, they don’t want me to come in.

Kerri:
Yeah exactly. So yes, I do agree sometimes if you have the budget then certain events are really worthwhile. But you’ve got, it’s like any opportunity you just have to leverage it. You’ve got to make the most of it. You have to certainly, with exhibitions you know they’re expensive, you’ve got to make the most of it and talk to people. It’s not just about getting in the email address you know. And I’ve seen so many people walk away from exhibitions, they’re like yeah, we’ve got 100 emails addresses. And I’m like why like you didn’t actually make a sale, you didn’t actually qualify those 100 people like you didn’t actually talk to them. And you just got 100 business cards like they might not actually want to buy anything from you. You didn’t have a conversation with them. See you know you just got a yeah like I said heavy breakfast. And just approach people and make the most of it make the most of it.  Leverage any opportunity.

Ben:
It’s interesting that I think. I completely agree there with the business card things and the emails. Because even when I with EPR are you can’t just email everyone just because they put a business card in a box. It doesn’t mean you actually. Now well when the when the law comes into place, you don’t actually necessarily have a right to contact them about certain things. They’ve entered a prize draw, for example, that doesn’t give you the right to contact them and sell them stuff.

Kerri:
Absolutely yeah. That’s the thing. And god I hate it when you go to shows and they still even now years later have “Win an iPad”. I’m like, I don’t want to like really.

Ben:
Woah, you don’t want to win an iPad. I’ve always into these competitions, I never won the Ipad but I still want one.

Kerri:
Don’t get me wrong, if you want to give me an iPad. It’s fine but my creative brain just like explodes.

Ben:
It makes me so sad when you almost have to offer someone with a free price to just to give you a business card. I mean it’s almost like if they were a qualified lead, I prefer it that way. Where it’s almost like a qualified lead look if you’re actually genuinely interested stuff. And then everyone who’s genuine interest will get a chance of doing this because that’s what good businesses do. But actually, they’re just like a business card drop and it’s like Oh win a bag of sweets. That person may not even buy off, you even want to bother you and you’ve given away a prize for getting a business card. They may or may not be relevant whereas if you can get someone who’s actually more of a qualified lead they’ll appreciate that more. Because you’re like you’re only giving it to people who have a genuine interest in the products. Like I have a genuine interest and they’re giving me something as a reward for my genuine interest and probably likely to purchase in the future.

Kerri:
Exactly and like everyone loves things that are free. You know free draw, free gift or whatever. But if you just need to make that a bit more relevant to your audience as well. Or relevant to your product like think outside the box. Don’t just say, oh win an iPad. Think like actually the people that coming through here you know it if they work in an office you know. Think about what would they really love to have on their desk. Or think about those items that you do have on their desk. Yes, you can do like the pens and the mugs and things. But just thinking outside that box and something that they absolutely need and something they use every single day. You know give them stuff like that brand it obviously with your stuff on. But just trying to get a little bit more creative and that is what set you above everybody else. And that’ll show you as an expert.

Ben:
Absolutely love that. It’s almost like potentially instead of the five or a couple of questions that is. We talked all about that how you need to sort of put yourself out there and sort of being different and standing out there. But guess and we talked about actually, how you just sometimes it’s just good to ask what the right way is. Of asking how you actually go about approaching some of these News Corporation’s media outlets even individuals. And actually asking them or saying look I’m an expert come and interview me. Because that’s quite a daunting thing, just to go to a media committee. So for example, I’m Welsh I want to go to media Wales and say look I’m an authority in marketing and talking about this. You need to interview me next time, how do I actually go out and ask sort of media Wales? As an example or any sort of US, UK, European media whoever’s listening. I know we’ve got people from Bangladesh listening so a Bangladeshi media. How do we how do we approach them?

Kerri:
Well, first of all, is basically, not to introduce yourself as an expert. Most people this is the mistake that I would say 99.9% of people make is. They will say for instance, if it was me they say “Hi I’m Kerri Watt I talk about this, this is what I do for clients”. But that doesn’t give an editor or a journalist anything to work from. You’re making them do the hard work because they then have to try and find a place for you in their magazine and their newspaper or whatever. But if you email them and you say “Hi I’m Kerri Watt I wondered if you’d be interested in an article about X Y Z”. And you actually give them the topic or the title. You’re kind of showing that you have read their magazine or their newspaper or whatever is that they write about. And you’re not just kind of blasting the same thing out to one hundred people. And you actually give them an idea rather than just introduce yourself. So you’re giving them something to say yes or no to, rather than just hey this is me what do you think.

Ben:
Yeah, it’s much easier for people to say no to. It’s even much easier people say there’s, click just go up junk box, junk box. I have to actually think journalists having to work harder and harder out. It’s not like when they had million them around and the stories and they were always researching and they were well-funded and they got and do these things. Actually now with PR and stuff. Everyone’s gone with you’ve almost have a hand feed them and they’ve got then pick the best ones from that. So yeah, you’ve almost got it all literally just put it in front of their laps going. You cannot say no to this. This is a look I’ve written the article for you. I’ve given you the quotes. I’ve given you the story or you let you have to do is put your name next to it and print it.

Kerri:
That’s the thing. I think what people get stuck on is. Yes, there’s the fear of rejection of getting a no from you know a national newspaper or something. But they also think if they’re pitching an article that they need to send the article and often you just need to send the idea. So you don’t have to spend hours writing something, you can just send an email. And just say, “Hey I wonder if you’d be interested in this”. And you can also I guess certainly with magazines you know once you read the magazines and they have you know maybe spotlight features. Or that you know if they do a certain thing every week, you can actually say that in your email. I do this and I wondered if there’s a space in the spotlight feature or something. So, your kind of showing them that you’ve read what they’re writing.

Ben:
Yeah, you’re paying them a little bit of a compliment. What everyone knows that it sounds weird but everyone likes them ego massaged, a little bit every now and then.

Kerri:
Absolutely and getting it in front of the right person as well, that’s really important. So on the websites of these places, so any you would like to be featured, they might have for the editorial click here. And it will have an email address for like editorial or news or something like that. And you just need to send it to an actual person so use LinkedIn or Twitter to say for instance to find the editor of the daily mail. Something like that and then rather than just sending it to info@news.com hello@news.com because that’s never going to get to the right person.

Ben:
Yeah, I’ve been that’s a good point to make, isn’t it. Those generic email addresses where it’s like “hello”, “welcome”, “hi”, “bye”, “whatever”. They may as well say bye or not going to reply to you. Whereas if you get to an individual you address it to them, you make it slightly personal you make it relatable. It’s almost essential, it’s the general basics of what good marketing is. It’s personal, it’s relatable, you’re offering a solution in there. And you’re empathising that look the other you haven’t got time and a huge amount of time. But look here’s some couple of ideas that I spread from here I’ve seen what you’ve lot written about this but all the things that good marketing is you. Essentially you put a couple of line email.

Kerri:
Yes, that’s right.

Ben:
You pause then  I was like panicking. I have I said the wrong thing and I was panicking. But I think that’s a really important point to make though, isn’t it. It’s actually not being scared of the failure, not being scared of the rejection. It’s about actually putting yourself out there and giving the information. You’ve almost I said you don’t have to write the full article but you could have come up with ideas. And you’ve got to come up with the right ideas for the right person at the right time.

Kerri:
Exactly and what’s the worst that could happen. It’s not pitching for new business, so the worst that could happen is that they say no or they don’t respond. And a lot of people get stuck when they don’t get responses and they think oh you know I’m useless, I’m really bad, they hated it. And the chances are, it may not have even got read you know. They could have a really hot news topic could have come in that day and they just completely forgot to look at all the email pictures they’ve got that day. Or a journalist could have looked at them out thought “oh yes good I’ll reply after lunch” and just forgot. They’re only human so if you don’t hear anything, I always say to people just try again in a couple of weeks. And if after like two or three no responses you don’t get anything back, just change up your idea. Maybe it wasn’t right for them. So just yeah just change it and try again.

Ben:
Yeah when you say sort of try again, would after if you haven’t heard a thing the first time? Do you adjust the content slightly but keep the premise of the outline the same or how do you do it? You soon as you send the same email which you send the same email again. Would you say also you might add “you missed the last one here it is again” and almost copy and paste this topic we say. Or would you change up the wording of that then to try and say “oh look I’ve emailed you before you do not come back I don’t know if it’s of interest please just let me know either way”. How would you do it?

Kerri:
I try and keep it quite friendly rather than say did you receive my email. Because they probably received 300 a day so I usually just write pretty much the same if I know the idea I sent them is so good and so perfect for them. I will send the same thing again and yeah maybe change the way I worded the email or I was sending the same kind of template. I was pitching to lots of different places at the same time with the same kind of template. Obviously changing it for each one and none of them were working then definitely then I would look at the email as a whole. And just kind of switch it up and see with that.

Ben:
Yeah, it makes a huge amount of sense I think. It’s yeah it’s adjusted but not adjusted too much it looks like it’s a completely different email. Not being a case where it sounds like you’re harassing them or they’re the problem and they’re stopping you from doing this. It’s like oh look I’m still here, I’m here willing to offer a solution still. Is not like I’m here to ram this down your throat and make your life uncomfortable. I’d say look here, it is being polite and off you’re still offering a solution.

Kerri:
Exactly and they know that they’re in a position where they’re yes, means more to you then it does for them. They can potentially fill their magazine newspaper whatever 50 times over with all the pictures that they receive. So it’s you’ve got to still stay really friendly and approachable and not kind of here’s my idea.

Ben:
I think that’s a really sort of nice way to sort of wrap it up the conversation really. It’s actually just not being too over the top. Like you have to do everything now, you have to be absolutely all places regarding yourself as an expert. Throwing absolute content every but you can always be a little bit more strategic with it. You can be a little bit more be a bit more focused, need to be a little bit more savvy and personal about this. It’s not just a case of creating lots of content and you’re suddenly an expert. It’s actually about the way you do it. There’s a lot more than just sort of what you’re writing.

Kerri:
Definitely and you know there’s only a certain amount of hours in the day. We can’t be everywhere, we can’t do everything in certainly. If you’re doing it for yourself so you do have to get strategic. You do have to really hone down on you, who is my ideal client. But like actually, what are they reading watching and listening to and just focus on getting in front of them. That way you know maybe they listen to podcasts on a commute in the car on the way to work or maybe they watch YouTube videos on their lunch break. You really have a think about how they are consuming their media and their information and get in front of them the way.

Ben:
I think that’s an absolutely brilliant way to wrap it. But before I let you go I need to ask you what are the buzzwords out there right now are you hating or loving. What you were sort of getting on your nerves. Or what you like yes, I absolutely love this term in a moment.

Kerri:
Quite a lot of things frustrate me I guess. Because I consider myself the shepherd, not the sheep. So when lots of people start talking about silly things it makes me kind of retreat and goes oh no.

Ben:
Icky

Kerri:
Yeah, it’s so icky. Oh gosh, I can’t think off the top of my head oh so bad.

Ben:
I panicked you

Kerri:
I know, I should have written it down before and sorry.

Ben:
That’s right, well I said before I’ve got a list of about 100s different ones. So it’s always interesting to see what we’ve got in there. I mean as it is absolutely everything so from authority marketing and influencer marketing. Even just the things like viral content or dark social to machine learning and experience realisation. Which that is which the mouthful in itself account-based marketing conversion rate optimisation. There’s literally so many things, it’s amazing actually you learn this thing. As it people hear them every day in terms of some of them are just like thrown is a normal conversation. But then wraps you ask them, what is conversion rate optimisation? It all out then it’s like I don’t actually know. I just use this word all the time. And I don’t actually really understand what does it mean.

Kerri:
For me, its job titles thinking about it really. They always make me really laugh and especially the word entrepreneur. I actually really hate that phrase because people just like use it all the time. It’s like anyone who starts a business they call themselves, an entrepreneur without actually, realising what the term means. But also is when they take a spinoff of an entrepreneur, so like people call me mumpreneur because I have a young child. Like no, I’m a businesswoman. Why it matters if I have a child there isn’t dadpreneur or maybe there is somewhere but I haven’t heard.

Ben:
There definitely is yeah. I’ve annoyingly come across that one as well. I’ve also seen grandpapreneur, was well for grandpa.

Kerri:
Oh gosh, I’m all for like silly words and stuff. I make them up in my day to day life. But I don’t know the way that kind of, I was solopreneur. It’s like why we have to keep making words up like we what we all just we just run a business.

Ben:
No. It’s really interesting point, I think it’s one of those lingers. As people are trying to make themselves stand out and seem different. But actually, it just adds to the noise and the clutter. And it doesn’t actually make you’ve made up a word, great. But the problem is, you’ve not explained what that word is. Or it’s only you using in it. where does it all.

Kerri:
I found that mumpreneur title, I don’t know I just found it like really patronising. Certainly, when I started my business my son was a baby at the time. So they yeah so, I was called by a few people on mumpreneurs. I don’t really like the sound of that. I just felt like it was really degrading as to what I was trying to achieve the way.

Ben:
It was takes two away from you, just actually just being a woman right. Starting your own business and it’s like, oh well you’ve suddenly now got some sort of different status. Because you’ve got a suddenly because you have a son.

Kerri:
No, I want to be you know. I want to play in the big playground still. Like I know you know I still like world domination. Like, don’t give me that weird title yeah.

Ben:
Brilliant, hey thank you so much for coming on today. Carry it be an absolute blast and I think you’ve really sort of helped define what authority marketing is. And what it means and actually how people can even sort of build their own authority going forward. Si thank you very much that today.

Kerri:
Pleasure, thank you.

Ben:
Bye.

 

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here